LIFE IN SIX WORDS


In the 1920s, Ernest Hemingway bet ten dollars that he could write a complete story in just six words. He wrote: “For Sale: baby shoes, never worn.” He won the bet.

Now an online magazine is asking its readers to sum up their own lives in just six words.

Hemingway

‘For Sale: baby shoes, never worn’
USEFUL LINKS

Smith Online Magazine– Six Word MemoirsThe BBC is not responsible for the content of external websites

Smith, the American online magazine, has used the Hemingway anecdote to inspire its readers to write their life story in just six words, culminating in a book of the best contributions, entitled “Not Quite What I Was Planning”. We interviewed magazine editor, Larry Smith, what made him think of the idea.

YOUR SIX WORD MEMOIRS

Three sons, eleven cats, and Yvonne.
Michael Govan

Foetus, son, brother, husband, father, vegetable.
Dick Hadfield

Conceived,implored, employed, adored, retired, ignored.
Joy MacKenzie

Beginning, gurgly. Middle, sombre. End, gurgly.
Roger Noble

Jennie, Emma, Jane, Sophie, Rose, happiness.
Peter Graham

Slow lane. Fast lane. Hard shoulder.
Alex Hansen Today.

Bantam, Anglia, Midget, Alfa, Volvo Estate.
Neil Feldman.

PM. The World Tonight. Sleep?
Stephen Brady

Womb, Play, Learn, Work, Decline, Tomb.
Jacquie Smith

Start – programme – error – control – alt. – delete.
Alan

Outside lavatory, worked hard, now flush.
Ashley Errington

Battered ball-bearing traversing pinball machine.
Nancy Connolly

Unravelled career reknitted as baby blankets.
Clare Hobba

Started, farted, stood up, faced the wind.
Helen Eclair

Dot, two, six, three, one, wicket.
Tony Powell

Head in books, feet in flowers.
Heather Thomson

Trust me, I did my best.
Ray Kemp

An embroidered sampler, with some unpicking.
Sian Martin

Wrong era ,Wrong Class, Wrong Gender.
Patsy Wheatcroft

Love Mountains both ups and downs.
Dennis Lee

Best selling author? Instead there’s this.
Ann Cummins

Wasted my whole life getting comfortable.
Richard Merrington

Worry about tomorrow, rarely enjoy today!
Richard Rabone

Dazed and confused? No. Existential angst.
Chris Miles

Pass the bottle before clarity returns
Gail Edmans

Lifetime partner, love, laughs – what now?
Peter Elvish

I’m just happy to be here!
Graham Marsh

Four Weddings, Three kids, then cancer.
Gillian Johnson

Intermitent loves here, there, now, then.
Paul Wingett

30 years two girls now branching.
Davina Marshall

Not quite finished, tell you later.
Dave Nicholson

Really should have been a Lawyer.
Gules Fallan

Hasn’t Been A Jane Austen Romance.
Alexandra Lackey

Bored, so bored, so very bored.
John Doyle

Run over twice, thankfully still alive.
Trudi Evans

Aged child actress still seeking fame.
Doolallydaisy

Married childhood sweetheart. Two kids. Content.
Steve McMullen

Born London, lived elsewhere, died inside.
Patric

Partner, pension, motorhome, life is good.
Bob Lindblom

Some no-balls but several boundaries.
Di Attwood

Apple leads to eviction of two.
Una McMorran

Unfortunately I didn’t buy the t-shirt.
Caroline Ryan

Philosopher, fire-eater, barrister, careering through life.
Duncan Roy

My life? Six words? God knows.
Helen Underwood

Knight on white charger never showed.
Jane Kirk

No A Levels but a millionaire.
C North

Any chance I could start again?
Sunny Tailor

Lived, loved, laughed liberally and left.
Vince Horsman

Found it, Lost it, Found it.
Lucinda Lavelle

Worked all life still paying taxes.
John Ball

Born, bred.Work, wed.Dad, dead.
Colin Penfold

Tolerant woman took me in hand
Colin Bradley

Aspirations compromised by procrastination, then children.
Harry Beighton

Started slowly, then dash to line.
Richard Draper.

Happy days, sad days, empty days.
Richard Smallbone

Too many sausages, not enough sex.
Andrew Wilson

Can I start wearing purple yet?
Sue Boswell

Trekked to Everest.Married a sherpa.
Robert Moore

Laughed out loud, cried in silence.
Lisa from Weston

Age crept up and mugged me
Bill Cowan

If only I had turned left.
Robin Pickering

Thirty thousand insulin injections and counting.
Tim Kell

Saw, heard, learnt, loved, mourned, dying.
Aaron Asadi

Left mad Russian for mad Scotsman.
Maggie Morgan

Still searching around for the reins.
Jessica Kane

Run over twice, thankfully still alive.
Trudy Evans

Blankets, books, bottles, books, blankets.
Margaret Melling

Ditched the map, found better route.
Gillian Smellie

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lemniscate.gif BBC 4/SMITH ONLINE MAGAZINE

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30 BENEFITS OF EBOOKS

30 Benefits of Ebooks

Copyright © 2008 by Michael Pastore

1. Ebooks promote reading. People are spending more time in front of screens and less time in front of printed books.

2. Ebooks are good for the environment. Ebooks save trees. Ebooks eliminate the need for filling up landfills with old books. Ebooks save transportation costs and the pollution associated with shipping books across the country and the world.

3. Ebooks preserve books. (The library of Alexandria was burned and the collection ruined. Richard Burton’s wife, after his death and against his wishes, destroyed a book he had been working on for ten years. The original manuscript of Carlyle’s The French Revolution was lost when a friend’s servant tossed it into the fire.) Ebooks are ageless: they do not burn, mildew, crumble, rot, or fall apart. Ebooks ensure that literature will endure.

4. Ebooks, faster to produce than paper books, allow readers to read books about current issues and events.

5. Ebooks are easily updateable, for correcting errors and adding information.

6. Ebooks are searchable. Quickly you can find anything inside the book. Ebooks are globally searchable: you can find information in many ebooks.

7. Ebooks are portable. You can carry an entire library on one DVD.

8. Ebooks (in the form of digital audio books) free you to do other activities while you are listening.

9. Ebooks can be printable: and thereby give a reader most or all of the advantages of a paper-based book.

10. Ebooks defy time: they can be delivered almost instantly. Ebooks are transported to you faster than overnight shipping: in minutes or in seconds.

11. Ebooks defy space: ebooks online can be read simultaneously by thousands of people at once.

12. Ebooks are cheaper to produce. Thus, small presses can attempt to compete with media giants.

13. Ebooks are cheaper to buy.

14. Ebooks are free. The magnificent work of Project Gutenberg, and other online public libraries, allow readers to read the classics at no cost.

15. Ebooks can be annotated without harming the original work.

16. Ebooks make reading accessible to persons with disabilities. Text can be re-sized for the visually impaired. Screens can be lit for reading in the dark.

17. Ebooks can be hyper-linked, for easier access to additional information.

18. Ebooks — with additional software and hardware — can read aloud to you.

19. Ebooks let you tweak the style. Many ebooks allow readers to change the font style, font size, page size, margin size, colors, and more.

20. Ebooks may allow the option for the addition of multimedia: still images, moving images, and sound.

21. Ebooks, with their capacity for storage, encourage the publishing of books with many pages, books that might be too expensive to produce (and purchase) in paperback.

22. Ebooks — without outrageous DRM schemes — are made for sharing. Ebooks can be quickly duplicated, and then distributed to strangers or given to your friends. Worry no more about your loaned books that will never be returned.

23. Ebooks empower individuals to write and to publish, and in this way help to challenge “the crushing power of big publishing”, that excludes so many authors from the New York City publishing circus. Publishing can move from the impersonal and profitable, to the personal and pleasurable.

24. Ebooks — thanks to the simplicity and speed of publication and feedback — allow authors to experiment in many themes and styles.

25. Ebooks posted online encourage comments, corrections, and feedback — which eliminates mistakes and improves accuracy — especially important when dealing with scientific and technological issues.

26. Ebooks allow publishers to publish (and readers to read) works by a larger number of authors, and works on a wider variety of topics. Critics of traditional book publishing (such as Jason Epstein and Andre Schriffin) state that economic pressures have reduced and limited the number of authors and topics that traditional publishers will now produce.

27. Ebooks defeat attempts at censorship. All these works were banned: Analects by Confucius. Lysistrata by Aristophanes. Ars Amorata by Ovid. Pro Populo Anglicano Defensio by John Milton. The Scarlet Letter by Hawthorne. Wonder Stories by H.C. Andersen. Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman. The Kreutzer Sonata by Leo Tolstoy. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, and Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain. Ulysses by James Joyce. … Many of these books were confiscated, burned, or denied availability in libraries, bookstores and schools. Ebooks guarantee that readers maintain their right to read.

28. Ebooks help paperbook publishers to sell paperbooks. Cory Doctorow has explained that the giving away of ebooks, for free, has helped to sell the paperback editions of his stories and novels.

29. Ebooks are evolving. As technology develops, ebooks may contain new features. For example, a book of recipes may contain a recipe calculator to figure how much maple syrup is needed to bake 200 cookies. An ebook that prepares you for the GRE could include an interactive test. An ebook about politics might allow you to click a link and register to vote, or send an email to a Congressman that tells him he is not a good environmental steward.

30. Ebooks are good for paperbook publishing. By setting an example for diversity and freedom of expression, ebooks may motivate the stagnant book publishing industry towards the renewal of small presses, the end of the blockbuster-bestseller publishing mentality, and a healthier balance between the needs of commerce and culture.

______________________________________________________________3jpeg-1.gif Lifehacker & epublishersweekly.blogspot.com

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QUOTES

from things that have happened and from all things that you know and all those you cannot know, you make something through your invention that is not a representation but a whole new thing finer than anything true and alive, and you make it alive, and if you make it well enough, you give it immortality. That is why you write and for no other reason… E.HEMINGWAY

“The allotted function of art is not, as is often assumed, to put across ideas, to propogate thoughts, to serve as an example. The aim of art is to prepare a person for death. To plow and harrow his soul.” ANDREI TARKOVSKY

“As I see it, life is an effort to grip before they slip through ones fingers and slide into oblivion, the startling, the ghastly or the blindingly exquisite fish of the imagination, before they whip away into the endless current and are lost forever in oblivion’s black ocean.”

The purpose of art is to tidy up one’s interior and exterior worlds. MERVYN PEAKE

“One absorbs all these feelings and ideas: if one is lucky they undergo an alchemestic transformation into gold and that is creative work.” JOHN WELLS 1948

“The symbol is not an allegory and not a sign, but an image of a content that largely transcends consciousness.”

…to take memory and make it new – to take the forgotten dead of the past and bring them to life again, through memory. . . . the psyche is an instrument for both caring for and containing the past, and for reconciling it to the present. . . .the power of inspiration that dwelt in memories of loss.