New Inca Road

Archaeologists discover previously unknown Inca road in Peru

Lima (Peru), July 13 (ANI): A team of archaeologists has discovered an Inca road in Peru, which was unknown until now and apparently held sacred, leading to the citadel of Machu Picchu.

According to a report in Today’s News, the discovery was made by archaeologists from the Peru National Culture Institute and technicians from Jaume I University in Castellon, Spain.

The Inca road is made of stone masonry approximately 1 meter (3 1/4 feet) wide, with sustaining walls along the way rising some 4 to 5 meters (13 to 16 feet) high, according to a communique from the Project Ukhupacha.

Several stretches of the road have collapsed that began at what is now the Wuarqtambo archaeological premises.

They went up Machu Picchu mountain and then came down from the citadel.

According to Fernando Astete Victoria, the director of the Machu Picchu National Historical Sanctuary, there had been evidence of an Inca road to the citadel different from the one that was known, and so its discovery became one of the Ukhupacha Project’s goals.

A large part of Peruvian territory is united by different extensions of a great Inca road leading to the sanctuary of Machu Picchu, built high on a ridge and declared a World Heritage Site in 1983.

The archaeologists involved in the project said that this road could have been held sacred, so it was only traveled by spiritual leaders who celebrated religious rites.

The team of experts will carry out another expedition to determine the route and length of the road, since it is apparent that several stretches have been destroyed on the western slope of Machu Picchu mountain. (ANI)

Reprinted from ANI News

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Oldest Musical Instrument

Monday, July 13, 2009

35 000 year old flute oldest instrument ever found

Prehistorian historian Nicholas Conard presents the bone flute from Hohle Fels to journalists in the southern German city of Tuebingen. Stone Age humans may have ripped raw meat from the bone with their teeth but they also played music, according to a study reporting the discovery of a 35,000-year-old flute, the oldest instrument known.

Reprint from YahooNews

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GOBEKLI TEPE – TURKEY

Stone Age Temple May Be Birthplace of Civilization

Monday, November 17, 2008 | FoxNews.com
0_61_gobekli_monolith

One of the T-shaped monoliths in Gobekli Tepe, this one bearing a relief of a fox.

It’s more than twice as old as the Pyramids, or even the written word. When it was built, saber-toothed tigers and woolly mammoths still roamed, and the Ice Age had just ended.

The elaborate temple at Gobekli Tepe in southeastern Turkey, near the Syrian border, is staggeringly ancient: 11,500 years old, from a time just before humans learned to farm grains and domesticate animals.

According to the German archaeologist in charge of excavations at the site, it might be the birthplace of agriculture, of organized religion — of civilization itself.

“This is the first human-built holy place,” Klaus Schmidt of the German Archaeological Institute says in the November issue of Smithsonian magazine.

Schmidt and his colleagues say no evidence of permanent settlement has been found at the site, although there are remains of butchered animals and edible plants.

However, all of the bones are from wild animals, and all the vegetation from wild plants. That means the massive structure was built by a hunter-gatherer society, not a settled agricultural one.

Yet the three dozen T-shaped standing limestone monoliths arranged around the site are 10 feet high, weigh several tons each and bear detailed, stylized carvings of foxes, scorpions, lions, boars and birds. The builders may not have been farmers, but they weren’t primitive.

Massive amounts of manpower would have been needed to build the site, a logistical problem that may have spurred the builders to begin planting grain and herding wild sheep, Schmidt thinks.

Wild grain ancestral to modern wheat grows nearby, and the site itself is just outside the city of Sanliurfa, known as Edessa to the Crusaders — and which locals say is the Biblical city of Ur, birthplace of Abraham. The Euphrates flows eighty miles to the west, putting Gobekli Tepe smack in the middle of the Fertile Crescent.

“This shows sociocultural changes come first, agriculture comes later,” Stanford archaeologist Ian Hodder tells Smithsonian magazine. “You can make a good case this area is the real origin of complex Neolithic societies.”

Reprinted from Smithsonian Magazine
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